There will be an opportunity to Gift Aid your donation, and/or to direct your gift to the brothers, or sisters or a particular house, after you have completed the final page on PayPal (PayPal account not required).

Interfaith

Greenbelt 2017

Sisters and Brothers from the First and Third Orders were present at the Greenbelt Festival held in the Boughton Estate. The Daily Office and Eucharist were offered in the Franciscan tent and the ‘Mobile Monastery’ was also there. The Festival (which was entitled ‘The Common Good’) provided numerous opportunities for people to listen to music, poetry and talks as well as to socialise and pray. In addition to the Franciscans (Bev, Chris James, Maureen, Hugh and Finnian) three other Anglican Religious Sisters were also present Sr Hilda Mary CSC, Sr Catherine CHN and Sr Helen OHP.

 

The Franciscan Tent.

The Franciscan contingent (and friends)

The Rev’d Debbie Plummer TSSF presiding at the Eucharist.

Franciscans show their solidarity with Refugees.

Br Robert writes:

newcastle-welcomes-refugees-300x225

One Saturday in mid-September, whilst the heavens were pouring down with rain, 500 hardy people came out to show that Refugees are welcome in the North East. Among the crowd marching to Newcastle City Council who met to discuss the issue, were two Franciscan Brothers. As usual, it was a great opportunity to connect with all sorts of people most of whom knew nothing about Franciscan life or had ever heard about Anglican Franciscans but there were also great conversations with the odd Theological student and with friends from the Quakers. After the speeches we followed several people to pack boxes for the Refugees in Calais, which were collected in the area to show solidarity with the Refugees in Calais. It was inspiring to see the incredible generosity of the people which manifested itself in a store house full of huge piles with food and clothing.

General Chapter

From Monday 7th September until Friday 11th September the majority of Sisters and Brothers from the First Order of the Society of St Francis met in the King’s Park Conference Centre (Northampton) for the General Chapter. The theme for this General Chapter was engaging with people of non-Christian Faiths and we had the great privilege of meeting people from the Buddhist, Jewish and Muslim Faiths. On Tuesday morning Fr Damian Howard SJ delivered a most interesting lecture on Islam suggesting that we should not be afraid to engage our Muslim friends and neighbours in conversation about our Faiths. In the afternoon we heard a thought provoking lecture on Buddhism given by Ajahn Amaro who is the Abbot of the Amaravati Buddhist Monastery. On Wednesday morning Dr Jane Williams gave two sessions on two meditations on passages of Scripture which suggest a possible framework for co-operation with people of other faiths and then on Wednesday afternoon two expeditions were organised, one to Amaravati Buddhist Monastery and the other to the Benedictine Monastery in Turvey. On Thursday morning we were introduced by Professor David Ford to the practice of ‘Scriptural Reasoning‘ (a way of discussing comparable passages of Scripture with people of other Faiths) and were then able to observe a Scriptural Reasoning session being conducted by Christians, Jews and Muslims. On Thursday evening we were fortunate to be joined by our Bishop Protector (Bishop Stephen Cottrell of the Diocese of Chelmsford) who celebrated Mass with us an delivered an entertaining and challenging sermon.

Sr Sue CSF, Sr Damien OSC, Brs Christian and Hugh SSF with Julie Siddiqui

Sr Sue CSF, Sr Damien OSC, Brs Christian and Hugh SSF with Julie Siddiqui

Sr Chris, Brs Jason and Malcolm sharing a cup of tea with Imam Ibrahim Mogra

Sr Chris, Brs Jason and Malcolm sharing a cup of tea with Imam Ibrahim Mogra

Sr Sue visits Korea.

In April Sue spent 2 weeks in Korea visiting Frances and Jemma, the CSF sisters there. They have now lived in their purpose built traditional Korean style convent at Il-Seon-Ri near Gumi for one year, and have planted a small garden around it. Alongside their other ministries they are members of Samsohoe, a movement of sisters and nuns from different faiths in Korea, who meet together regularly to share concerns and pray for peace. During Sue’s visit the group met at Holy Cross Convent in Seoul. The sisters – Anglican, Roman Catholic and Protestant Christians, and Buddhists of different traditions talked together about justice and peace issues, and sang a Korean version of St. Francis’ Canticle of the Sun. They also spent time in silent prayer for peace. Jemma was across the room, but Frances and Sue are in the picture.

Samsohoe 21.4.15 at Holy Cross

Samsohoe meeting.

In September Frances and Jemma will be visiting UK to join all the sisters and brothers for the European Province’s General Chapter, where the theme will be “Faith to Faith: Franciscans in a multi-faith society.” As there are no CSF sisters elsewhere in that part of the world the two Korean sisters are part of CSF’s European Province, and obviously both UK and Korea are multi-faith societies, though in very different ways.

Jemma in the garden at Il-Seon-Ri

Jemma in the garden at Il-Seon-Ri

In Seoul Sue also had the opportunity to connect briefly with Brothers Stephen and Raphael who are part of the Korean SSF community at Gangchon Friary. They are members of the Province of the Divine Compassion which encompasses the SSF brothers New Zealand, Australia, Sri Lanka as well as Korea.

Korea

The CSF sisters in South Korea are part of CSF’s European Province, and so are included on this website, whereas the SSF brothers belong to the Province of the Divine Compassion which may be accessed here.

Sr Jemma learning carpentry

Sr Jemma learning carpentry

Gumi Convent.

In the Gyeongsangbukdo Province of South Korea, in the Diocese of Busan, at the outskirts of Gumi, there is a beautiful and peaceful traditional Korean village where in 2014 we built a traditional Korean-style convent. Il-Seon-Ri is a model village, formed according to the principles of Confucian thought, and in this place the Korean Franciscan sisters have put down roots among the villagers, working to enable the budding forth of a new way of living that allows Confucianism and Christianity to co-exist side by side.  To people thirsty for rest and peace, tired out by the complexities of modern life, the sisters offer a warm welcome and friendship, prayer and the opportunity for spiritual guidance.  Through working for the welfare of young people and the production of clerical vestments, the Korean sisters are forming links with the church and the local community; and by actively welcoming those who wish to visit the convent, the ‘open days’ of Tuesday to Saturday provide an opportunity to share in the Daily Office and the day to day life of the convent.  With two guest rooms, the outer traditional form of the building is complemented by an interior with the comforts of modern living, and the guests are welcome to use the convent chapel, living room, garden, and common spaces of the house.

DSCF6929

Outside the Convent in Il-Seon-Ri

003

Srs Frances (seated) and Jemma with visiting Sisters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sharing a meal

Sharing a meal

With Guests

With Guests

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taize service in chapel - Frances on keyboard (2)

Taize service in Chapel

 

 

005

Frances, Jemma and Stephen SSF at Seoul Franciscan Centre

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

삼소회 평화회의 합창사진

At a Samsoehoe interfaith gathering

 Samso Leaflet

Understanding Islam at Hilfield.

FrancisSultan
The present crisis in Syria and Iraq, and anxieties about international terrorism, are heightening fear and prejudice in our own western culture about Muslims and the religion of Islam to which the terms violence and extremism are often attached. If we are to live peaceably and justly in the multi-cultural society that we find ourselves today it is important to have a broader view of the religion of Islam than that of the violence and brutality of the forces of the so-called Islamic State. Fear and hatred between people of different religions and cultures comes about as a result of ignorance or partial understanding of what the religions and cultures are about; it is easy to portray or fit ‘the other’ into one’s misunderstanding and so reinforce the fears – at this time, particularly, of Muslims.

Chris HewerDr Chris Hewer, who led a course at the Friary in October entitled ‘Understanding Islam’, is a Christian theologian who has thirty years of experience studying Islam and engaging with Muslims. While remaining firmly rooted in his own tradition, Chris gives a knowledgeable and sympathetic introduction to the subject, explaining the history of Islam, the place of the prophet Mohammed and of the Koran, and of the world views and ways of life of Muslims today. The 3 day course at Hilfield was attended by people from different parts of the UK, including some Muslims from Dorset. Wisdom was shared, mutual respect was established and friendships were made. All religions are definitely not the same but we can live peaceably and hospitably with each other through understanding and humility before each other and under God.

Interfaith Conference in Turkey.

Kentigern recently attended a conference on Inter faith and ecumenical dialogue hosted by the Roman Catholic Franciscans (OFM) in Istanbul.  As part of the conference the group visited some of the ‘Seven Churches of Revelation’ in Anatolia. There is a report of the Conference here

Members of the Group standing outside a rare Mughal-influenced Mosque in Istanbul

Members of the Group standing outside a rare Mughal-influenced Mosque in Istanbul

Members of the group standing in front of the Hagia Sophia (formerly the Patriarchal Cathedral of Constantinople and Imperial Mosque of Mehmet II)

Members of the group standing in front of the Hagia Sophia (formerly the Patriarchal Cathedral of Constantinople and Imperial Mosque of Mehmet II)

Br Kentigern in the Hagia Sophia

Br Kentigern in the Hagia Sophia

Br Kentigern at the ruins in Pergamon (Temple of Trajan)

Br Kentigern at the ruins in Pergamon (Temple of Trajan)