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Monthly Archives: December 2013

CSF Convent Construction in South Korea

The CSF Sisters’ new convent building at Il-Seon-Ri, near Gumi in South Korea is progressing well and is currently ahead of schedule.

 

view from the road adjacent to the site on 6th November

view from the road adjacent to the site on 6th November

on 21st November

on 21st November

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the traditional entrance and adjacent area on 24th November

the traditional entrance and adjacent area on 24th November

view from the road on 24th December

view from the road on 24th December

Happy Christmas

Reflections and meditation for Christmas Day.

http://www.franciscans.org.uk/resources/seasons-festivals-and-holy-days/christmas-day

Travel information for Sr Teresa’s funeral

Travel information for Teresa’s funeral

Parking St Germain’s, Egdbaston B16 9TD is on the corner of Portland Road and City Road, and the entrance is actually on City Road. The church is a redbrick building, standing in its own ground. There is some parking space on the grass in the church grounds, but please do not park on the gravel path from the road to the church. There is roadside parking on both City Road and Portland Road. Portland Road is preferable because less busy. There are no public car parks nearby.

Public Transport: It will be most economical to get a Day Saver Ticket costing £4. You need to have the exact money for your ticket when you board the bus.

Buses 127, 128 and 129 from Colmore Row in Birmingham City Centre go along City Road and will take you to the church. One of these runs every 10 minutes and the journey takes just under 20 minutes. The church will be on your left on the corner of Portland Road. Get off the bus at George Dixon School, which is just past the church.

From New Street Station Colmore Row is a short walk (about 500 yards and uphill). New Street Station is currently being redeveloped and is a building site, so precise directions are tricky – things change.

However from the temporary concourse/ticket barrier area turn left towards New Street. Turn left into New Street and right up Temple Street. At the top of Temple Street, cross over Temple Row and walk straight on across St Philip’s Cathedral precincts. Colmore Row runs along the cathedral precincts at the far side. On Colmore Row there are bus guides, maps and several bus stops. Snow Hill Station is very close by.

To avoid the walk turn right from the temporary concourse/ticket barrier area following signs for buses. Cross Queens Drive to reach bus stops outside the shops near Boots. Take bus no 82 (destination Bearwood) or 87 (destination Dudley, Oldbury). These buses also stop at Moor Street Station just before they get to this stop. One of these buses runs every 5 minutes. Get off at Birmingham Town Hall in Paradise Street – this is only 4 stops but takes 10 minutes because of the traffic. From one of the Town Hall bus stops pick up bus 127, 128 or 129 which will take you along City Road to the church (See above).

Alternatively you can stay on the 82 or 87 until you reach Summerfield Park in Dudley Road. This takes 20 minutes. At Summerfield Park walk to an adjacent bus stop on the same side of the road to get bus 11A and get off at George Dixon School which is just past St. Germain’s Church, on City Road. This is about 5 stops ( 7 minutes) from Summerfield Park, and these buses are timetabled to run every 10 minutes, but see below re possible delays.

Bus 11 – the outer circle 11A anticlockwise; 11C clockwise. This is a very long route bus route which takes two and a half hours to complete and can be subject to significant delays. But it would get you to St. Germain’s Church from various points around the edge of Birmingham, so might be useful for some.

The 11 bus route:

11 C clockwise: Perry Barr – Erdington – Acocks Green – Kings Heath – Cotteridge – Bearwood – Perry Barr via Witton, Fox & Goose, Stechford, Yardley, Hall Green, Selly Oak, Harborne, Winson Green and Handsworth

11A anticlockwise: Perry Barr – Bearwood – Cotteridge – Kings Heath – Acocks Green – Erdington – Perry Barr via Handsworth, Winson Green, Harborne, Selly Oak, Hall Green, Yardley, Stechford, Fox & Goose and Witton

See http://nxbus.co.uk/routes/west-midlands/B011A/?timetable[day]=& for timetables etc.

Carol Singing for Charity

Sr Sue CSF joined others from local churches for 4 hours of carol singing at London Bridge Station on 13th December to raise money for ROBES the winter night shelter run by local churches. As you can see it was distinctly chilly, but the morning and evening rush hour commuters donated just over £1325 to help homeless people.

 

Carol Singing in the morning

Carol Singing in the morning

Carol Singing in the Evening

Carol Singing in the Evening

Funeral Arrangements for Sr Teresa CSF

Sr Teresa’s funeral will be on Friday 3rd January at 12.30 at St Germain’s Church Edgbaston, and will be followed by a buffet lunch at the Church. The address of the church is 180 Portland Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham B16 9TD. It is near the junction with City Road.

The Committal will be at Birmingham Crematorium, 389 Walsall Road, Perry Barr, B42 2LR, at 2.15 immediately after the service. We expect that only a few people will attend the committal. They will need to travel by car and they will then return to the church to join the reception.

Information about parking and public transport will appear on the website shortly.

If you plan to attend please inform the sisters in Birmingham hilarycsf@franciscans.org.uk  as soon as possible to assist them in making the necessary arrangements.

 

 

Sister Teresa CSF – Rest in Peace

Teresa portraitSister Teresa, (Nan Foster), was born on 27 December 1928 and died on 16 December 2013. She made her Profession in CSF on 3 April 1967. Over the years Teresa served the Community in a variety of roles, in different parts of the world. She was CSF’s Minister General from 1996 – 2002.

Teresa died Albion Court Care Centre in Birmingham where she had been resident since the spring of 2012. She had been living with Alzheimer’s disease for some years, and had become increasingly frail.

Last Friday we were told that she she was not expected to recover from her most recent chest infection. We are grateful to the staff at Albion Court for their excellent care of Teresa, whom they clearly held in great affection. Sr Jannafer was with Teresa when she died just after 8am, and other sisters and friends had also been with her at various points over the weekend.

The funeral will be in Birmingham in the New Year and arrangements will be made known in due course. May she rest in peace and rise in glory.

 

RADICAL THEN, RADICAL NOW: Care and Education in Communities

On Nov 9th 2013, Hilfield Friary celebrated the centenary of the Little Commonwealth, in our buildings at Hilfield from 1913 – 18, and Homer Lane, its charismatic leader with educational ideas almost more radical today than 100 years ago, with a group of leading practitioners, academics, writers and thinkers reflecting on the future of residential therapeutic child care and education, organised by Craig Fees of The Child Care History Network. 35 visitors came, among them several from Scotland, 3 Mennonites coming from Ireland just for the day, and 3 teachers from the Kinokuni Children’s village in Japan.

The Little Commonwealth Court Book (thanks to the Earl of Sandwich and the Dorset History Centre), in which the citizens listed their misdemeanours and the discipline they imposed upon themselves.  The smaller book is the visitor’s book with the signatures of the suffragette Sylvia Pankhurst   and Lord Baden Powell.

The Little Commonwealth Court Book (thanks to the Earl of Sandwich and the Dorset History Centre), in which the citizens listed their misdemeanours and the discipline they imposed upon themselves. The smaller book is the visitor’s book with the signatures of the suffragette Sylvia Pankhurst and Lord Baden Powell.

Judith Stinton (in the centre), author of A Dorset Utopia, leading a tour of the Little Commonwealth buildings.

Judith Stinton (in the centre), author of A Dorset Utopia, leading a tour of the Little Commonwealth buildings.

Judith telling us about the pump house, one of the first buildings to be built.

Judith telling us about the pump house, one of the first buildings to be built.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Fielding, Emeritus Professor of Education and author of Radical Education and the Common School – a democratic alternative (2012) spoke on “Self-government, shared responsibility and the possibility of radical democratic education”.

Albert Lamb, children’s book author, spoke on “The Rescue of Childhood: Homer Lane and A.S. Neill”. Neill was heavily influenced by Lane and founded Summerhill School, at which Albert Lamb was both a pupil and teacher.

Dr Craig Fees organised the conference in our newly refurbished recreation room, formerly the Little Commonwealth schoolroom

Dr Craig Fees organised the conference in our newly refurbished recreation room, formerly the Little Commonwealth schoolroom

Brother Philip Bartholomew, SSF told us how the small school Fr Owen started at Hilfield in WWII, using some of Lane’s ideas, led to the founding of St. Francis School, Hooke.

Charles Sharpe, a psychotherapist, spoke on “Freedom cannot be given. It is taken by children and demands the privilege of conscious wrong-doing.” Has Homer Lane’s thesis space to be accommodated in the 21st century?

After lunch, Br Vincent led us in dedicating a centenary celebration oak tree.

Emily Charkin, a PhD student in the history and philosophy of radical education, showed slides to illustrate her talk “Building and Learning: Exploring the fundamentals of radical education and child care”. Children building their own schools can learn more than being in an expensive purpose built flagship school.

John Diamond, CEO of the Mulberry Bush organisation, gave a paper  entitled “The children of the dangerous and perishing classes” to explore why a lived experience of communal living with emotionally troubled children offers a model of authentic shared responsibility.

David Gribble of the International Democratic Education Network and founder of the Sands School in Devon, in his talk “Similar ideas in dissimilar settings”, told us about democratic schools in Japan and India

David Lane, Chair of CCHN, summed up the day – “Gathering thoughts for the Future: CCHN’s next five years”

Some delegates not only wanted to see and learn about the Little Commonwealth and the community we have here today, but also spent the night before the conference in the buildings that Lane, helped by the child citizens, built, Veronica (now Juniper House) and Bracken (now Bernard House)

The tour outside Bernard House

The tour outside Bernard House

Full details of the conference will be on www.cchn.org.uk in due course.